The Los Angeles public school system has been given until Monday to pay a ransom or risk having its data released on the dark web, which could potentially reveal the private data of students and staff.

Superintendent of Los Angeles Public Schools Alberto Carvalho responded by declaring on Friday that the district would not pay the ransom and would not engage in negotiations, as advised by law enforcement and federal authorities.

The Los Angeles public school system has been given until Monday to pay a ransom or risk having its data released on the dark web, which could potentially reveal the private data of students and staff.

The deadline was published on the dark web page run by Vice Society, which had previously given informal confirmation to at least three reporters that it was behind the hack that L.A.

Unified discovered on September 3 during the Labor Day weekend, when most district employees had four days off from work.

District and law enforcement officials have refrained from blaming Vice Society, but federal officials posted a warning about the syndicate to educational institutions right away after the attack on the country's second-largest school system.

Carvalho has admitted that the group responsible for the attack is well-known to law enforcement and has a history of attacking school systems.

Carvalho did not dispute media reports Friday identifying Vice Society. He continued to refuse to specify the amount being demanded as he had in the past.